Waste as a Resource

At Shak & Kai we don't rely on virgin fibers to produce our items.
By giving a second life to fibers, we are able to save enormous amount of water, pesticides, dyes and C02 emissions.

Every Shak & Kai item has a story to share, here is their journey.  

Textile waste

The journey of every Shak & Kai item starts here, as textile waste. In the textile industry, when clothes are manufactured, an important part of the initial fabric is cut out and thrown away. This represents approximately 15% of the resources wasted. We collect those scraps, sort them by colour and bring them back to our recycling facilities to bring them back to life. 

Why does this matter? 

- We stop quality resources from going to waste
- We save huge quantity of water
- We reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy needs

Mechanically Grinded

After being processed and sorted by colors, cotton scraps are then mechanically grinded and shredded back into fibers. The mechanical process enables us to retrieve the cotton fiber without affecting its quality. 

Why do we sort by color? 

We grind fibers by huge batches of the same color, thanks to this process, we get our desired color without applying any dyes to the recycled cotton. 


Back to fiber 

Following the grinding process, the cotton fiber is shorter than a virgin cotton fiber. In order to give our yarns the strength needed to create a long-lasting item, the recycled cotton fibers are then mixed with polyester (sourced from recycled plastic bottles). The polyester fiber will wrap the cotton fibers, creating a strong new 100% recycled mix.

What's the impact of the new fiber created? 

The recycled fiber consumes 98% less water, emits 99% less CO2, all of which without pesticides, nor toxic chemicals usually found in conventional textiles. 


New Life

No dyes are applied to cotton thanks to the initial sorting of cotton scraps by colors. During the mix of fibers, the last stage of the recycling process, a small quantity of low impact dyes have yet to be put into the recycled polyester. The reason? Ensuring a unified color along the entire yarn. 

Why no-dye cotton is better ?  

The most polluting process in cotton garments creation is the dying process (even for organic cotton). By recovering fibers without applying new dyes, we avoid huge quantity of toxic chemicals found in conventional dyes from ending up polluting the environment. 

Textile waste

The journey of every Shak & Kai item starts here, as textile waste. In the textile industry, when clothes are manufactured, an important part of the initial fabric is cut out and thrown away. This represents approximately 15% of the resources wasted. We collect those scraps, sort them by colour and bring them back to our recycling facilities to bring them back to life.

Why does this matter?

- We stop quality resources from going to waste
- We save huge quantity of water
- We reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy needs

Mechanicaly Grinded

After being processed and sorted by colors, cotton scraps are then mechanically grinded and shredded back into fibers. The mechanical process enables us to retrieve the cotton fiber without affecting its quality.

Why do we sort by color?

We grind fibers by huge batches of the same color, thanks to this process, we get our desired color without applying any dyes to the recycled cotton.

Back to fiber 

Following the grinding process, the cotton fiber is shorter than a virgin cotton fiber. In order to give our yarns the strength needed to create a long-lasting item, the recycled cotton fibers are then mixed with polyester (sourced from recycled plastic bottles). The polyester fiber will wrap the cotton fibers, creating a strong new 100% recycled mix.

What's the impact of the new fiber created?

The recycled fiber consumes 98% less water, emits 99% less CO2, all of which without pesticides, nor toxic chemicals usually found in conventional textiles.

New Life

No dyes are applied to cotton thanks to the initial sorting of cotton scraps by colors. During the mix of fibers, the last stage of the recycling process, a small quantity of low impact dyes have yet to be put into the recycled polyester. The reason? Ensuring a unified color along the entire yarn.

Why no-dye cotton is better ?

The most polluting process in cotton garments creation is the dying process (even for organic cotton). By recovering fibers without applying new dyes, we avoid huge quantity of toxic chemicals found in conventional dyes from ending up polluting the environment. 

Textile waste

The journey of every Shak & Kai item starts here, as textile waste. In the textile industry, when clothes are manufactured, an important part of the initial fabric is cut out and thrown away. This represents approximately 15% of the resources wasted. We collect those scraps, sort them by colour and bring them back to our recycling facilities to bring them back to life.

Why does this matter?

- We stop quality resources from going to waste
- We save huge quantity of water
- We reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy needs

Mechanicaly Grinded

After being processed and sorted by colors, cotton scraps are then mechanically grinded and shredded back into fibers. The mechanical process enables us to retrieve the cotton fiber without affecting its quality.

Why do we sort by color?

We grind fibers by huge batches of the same color, thanks to this process, we get our desired color without applying any dyes to the recycled cotton. 

Back to Fiber

Following the grinding process, the cotton fiber is shorter than a virgin cotton fiber. In order to give our yarns the strength needed to create a long-lasting item, the recycled cotton fibers are then mixed with polyester (sourced from recycled plastic bottles). The polyester fiber will wrap the cotton fibers, creating a strong new 100% recycled mix.

What's the impact of the new fiber created?

The recycled fiber consumes 98% less water, emits 99% less CO2, all of which without pesticides, nor toxic chemicals usually found in conventional textiles. 

New Life

No dyes are applied to cotton thanks to the initial sorting of cotton scraps by colors. During the mix of fibers, the last stage of the recycling process, a small quantity of low impact dyes have yet to be put into the recycled polyester. The reason? Ensuring a unified color along the entire yarn.

Why no-dye cotton is better ?

The most polluting process in cotton garments creation is the dying process (even for organic cotton). By recovering fibers without applying new dyes, we avoid huge quantity of toxic chemicals found in conventional dyes from ending up polluting the environment. 

Products made using recycled fibers